Implementing MOSTCO's Roadmap

August 25, 2016 // By Johann Stelzer, Microchip
Despite the media hype about Ethernet in the car, the MOST technology is still far more established in the infotainment domain than any other networking technology. The current roadmap, introduced at this year’s MOST Forum has been enhanced; additional waypoints and goals have been added to the roadmap. This article addresses the most significant aspects of these goals, the status and the outlook from Microchip’s perspective.

Promote MOST for global deployment

As of today, MOST Technology has been deployed in almost 200 car models worldwide and more than 200 million nodes have been installed at OEMs. In the past 12 months, many more car models were released to the market and Microchip’s annual shipment rate of INIC has continuously grown. The majority of the production volume moved from MOST25 to MOST50. Volume car makers GM and Toyota are driving the growth of MOST50 Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) quantity. MOST150 continues to grow, fueled by the migration from MOST25 optical to MOST150 optical at Audi, Daimler and Volvo. New carmakers have evaluated MOST50 UTP as well as MOST150 cPhy (coaxial cable). One new major OEM adopting MOST150 coax is slated for production in 2016, with more production starts are expected to follow throughout 2018 and at another OEM. MOST50 UTP continues to grow in volume both through additional models from existing users, new OEM adopters and new application use cases. MOST Cooperation Steering Committee, namely Audi, BMW, Daimler, Harman and Microchip Technology have supported a series of events in Europe and Asia. Several other MOST Cooperation OEM members like GM, Hyundai Kia Motor Company, Toyota and Volvo Cars assist MOST Technology global deployment through their contributions in events, PR and press releases, thus enabling about 20 Microchip Technology news releases since the previous MOST Forum in April 2015.

Hanser Automotive recently published the results of a survey conducted among car manufacturers, Tier1s and semiconductor vendors in 2015. OEMs rated standardization and multivendor support as most important for the deployment of an in-vehicle network technology. MOST Cooperation has successfully established MOST as the de facto standard for infotainment networking since its introduction in 2001. Further steps to accomplish wider proliferation have been initiated. In 2014, Microchip made MOST150 DLL specification available under RAND conditions, thus conforming to the prerequisites of multivendor support. Improved conditions for global deployment and

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