dSpace adds flexibility to its MicroAutoBox II prototyping system

August 19, 2011 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
The model-based programmability of its integrated Spartan-6 FPGAs plus new I/O expansion modules make the dSpace MicroAutoBox II prototyping system even more versatile. The system now can also be used for rapid control prototyping tasks.

The flexible technology can be used for low-latency analysis of large amounts of data independently of the MicroAutoBox processor. Examples of this type of applications include the design of innovative internal combustion engines. Compute-intensive signal processing algorithms can be performed in a resource-economic way in the FPGA. Since the FPGA can control multiple control and input channels concurrently, controls for electric motor and inverter are also typical fields of application.

In order to achieve this additional flexibility, dSpace conducted a number of modifications in the prototyping system: Effective immediately, the FPGA integrated in the MicroAutoBox II can be programmed with VHDL. Alternatively, the programming can be achieved by means of model-based methods through Matlab/Simulink in combination with Xilinx and dSpace tools. In addition, two new I/O expansion modules with extensive functionalities are available now. By plugging these modules onto the internal FPGA board, they can be completely integrated into the box.

The new DS1522 multi I/O module contains powerful analog and digital I/O interfaces. It allows the connection of sensors and actuators to the MicroAutoBox II FPGA.

For electric powertrain applications, dSpace now also offers its AC Motor Control solution for the MicroAutoBox II. The solutions contains a complete package with hardware and software components such as I/O module, RTI Block Set and Simulink demo models. The package solution supports functional prototyping for electric drives in e-cars and hybrid cars.

The added flexibility of the MicroAutoBox II FPGA also enables designers to implement many new applications such as developing active vibration damping systems, acoustic noise reduction methods, implementing highly precise positioning tasks as well as synchronous high-resolution signal generation.

For more information, visit www.dspace.de.