Holistic diagnosis system for electric cars developed

December 23, 2015 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
Like all cars, electric vehicles happen to break down or fail eventually. Technical problems in the powertrain of electrical can be more easily diagnosed and repaired if workshops use a standardised total diagnostic system developed in the DINA project.

Within the scope of the DINA projects, the participating companies devised a set of findings and recommendations for automotive supplier, car manufacturers, repair workshops and testing organisations that facilitate the repair of electric vehicles with focus on high-voltage components such as charging systems, batteries, converters, inverters and motors.

The holistic concept the Bosch-led consortium developed enables repair workshops to apply what the DINA group calls modularised maintenance. Its focused troubleshooting approach enables repair staff to pinpoint defective parts, avoiding the need to replace entire subsystems. Thus, the repair can be performed not only faster but also more cost-effectively.

It is of particular importance to exactly localise faults in the high-voltage battery. To facilitate maintenance at this critical component, the results of the study also contain concrete proposals as to the design of future battery systems. The diagnosis and repair methods developed by the DINA group will be fed into design projects in the automotive industry.

A look at the after-sales segment highlights the significance of the DINA project: Within the scope of regular technical check-ups, a precise examination and diagnosis of the powertrain is indispensible. In addition, the monetary value of the vehicle greatly depends on the stete of health of the high-voltage battery – after all, the energy storage is typically the most expensive component of the vehicle. The DINA project yielded valuable insights into methods how to determine this state of health. In addition, the researchers devised recommendations for new measurement instruments and repair workshop equipment.

Participants of the project which has been funded in part by the German federal research ministry were Bosch, test organisation Dekra Automobil GmbH, Fraunhofer’s Ernst Mach Institute as well as the Research Institute for Automotive and Engine Technology (Stuttgart, Germany)