Modular HiL test stand allows virtual test drives

December 16, 2015 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
The orangeHiL system enables developers to evaluate the behaviour of real-time control systems through simulation. Targeting the automotive domain in the first place, the system runs the necessary test and simulation software to meet all requirements to a full-fledged HiL (hardware-in-the-loop) test stand.

“With orangeHiL, users can simulate the condition of the vehicle before the first prototype is ever built”, explains Christian Wagner, CEO of orangeHiL creator in-tech GmbH. The system enables the evaluation of electronic control units (ECU) functionalit without the presence of their physical environment. Specific automotive ECUs such as transmission control or stability control can be tested independently of the vehicle on the test stand whereby the software running on the HiL test stand simulates the behaviour of a real vehicle under the conditions of the test. Towards this end, orangeHiL stimulates the module under test with a multitude of signals.

In the example of stability control ECU these signals would be wheel rpm, lateral and longitudinal acceleration, road surface friction and more. The orangeHiL system then receives the signals from the ECU under test for visualisation and evaluation. Thus, the developers can see if the ECU under test works as expected.

To perform these tests, the test stand is equipped with the same interfaces as the ECUs – CAN, LIN, Flexray as well as analogue, digital and PWM interfaces for sensors and actuators. The test engineers controls the orangeHiL system through a tablet app or through various PC programs. The app which runs under Android reads the sensor data on the CAN bus and transmits these data via Bluetooth or WiFi to a mobile terminal.

According to vendor in-tech GmbH, orangeHiL differs from existing HiL solutions through its modular, distributed approach. The EtherCAT control bus enables a modular, compact and cost efficient implementation. It is widely scalable and customisable. The modular approach allows testing of high voltages configurations – such as battery systems for electric and hybrid electric powertrains – locally separated from low the voltage parts of a tested system.

For more information visit www.in-tech.de