PMA reveals advanced specifications for vehicle wireless charging

March 06, 2014 // By Paul Buckley
Power Matters Alliance (PMA) is planning to expand features of the organization's automotive specification to standardize wireless charging requirements beyond what is currently available in the market.

The advanced specification, spearheaded by Triune Systems, aims to offer OEMs a more comprehensive set of features.

The automotive specification will incorporate multi-coil implementation for greater spatial freedom, alternative frequency ranges and reduced emissions to prevent interference with other vehicle systems.  The specification will also incorporate advanced architectures for better efficiency and field upgradability and is designed to keep pace with potential future requirements.

"Wireless charging requirements for the automotive industry are evolving rapidly, being driven by unique consumer expectations. Continuous innovation is required in order to satisfy all use cases," said Ken Moore, VP of Marketing for Triune Systems. "Triune is proud to be making a significant contribution to expand automotive specifications in this direction."

"Given our continual focus on the build out of infrastructure, the PMA is taking an aggressive position with the delivery of features that address the needs of the automotive industry. We are pleased that Triune Systems stepped up to accelerate the development of advanced automotive specifications for wireless charging," said Ron Resnick, President of the PMA.

The next release of the specification will not only increase the scope of features addressing the automotive industry but it will also satisfy higher power requirements targeting tablets and ultrabooks. These combined contributions will be the foundation for a PMA System Release due first half of 2014.

Related articles and links:

www.powermatters.org

www.dualmodeishere.com

www.triunesystems.com

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