UK startup releases vehicle-agnostic autopilot software

July 28, 2016 // By Christoph Hammerschmidt
Technology company Oxbotica (Oxford, UK) has launched its mobile autonomy software Selenium. Though the developers demonstrated the software in a purpose-built concept car, they claim that it can be applied to more or less any vehicle. Another unique feature: the software gets its bearings without relying on GPS.

Selenium can work in pedestrianised environments as well as roads and motorways, and is not reliant on GPS to operate – meaning it can easily transition between indoor and outdoor settings, over ground or underground. The system has been developed to be “vehicle agnostic”; according to the developers, it can be applied to cars, self-driving pods (e.g. for campuses and airports), and warehouse truck fleets.

The software was developed by Oxbotica’s team of scientists, mathematicians and engineers in the UK and is able to provide any vehicle it is applied to with an awareness of where it is, what surrounds it and, with that knowledge in hand, how it should move to complete a task.

Selenium’s system uses patented algorithms that gives vehicles a high level of intelligence to autonomously perform a range of mobility tasks, including motion control, braking, calibration, navigation, static and dynamic obstacle detection, the developers claim.

The software is set to be deployed at a series of autonomy trials where Oxbotica is the sole supplier of autonomy software, including the £8 million GATEway project in Greenwich and the LUTZ Pathfinder self-driving pod project in Milton Keynes. The company is also working with manufacturers in a broad spectrum of mobile autonomy domains, driverless cars.

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